Monthly Archives: December 2013

Tesla article by Srdjan Pavlovic

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I shall always remember my first day in school. In headmaster’s office, where my parents brought me for a short interview and welcome admission, first thing I had spotted high on the wall behind the headmaster’s desk was Tesla’s portrait. His eyes smiling and looking at me. « Mum, look, it’s Tesla over there », I yelled joyously as if I had recognized a long lost friend of mine.

Indeed, Tesla was not unknown to me, a little cheerful, lively kid growing up in peaceful Belgrade of seventies. I had been used to listen to bedtime stories that told not only about princes and fairy tales, but also quite a few Serbian epic poems as well. And, then, there were also stories about Tesla. A hero, wonder-maker, good-doer, a man almost magical but still human, real, caring and curious. I had kept asking my parents, already desperate and bored by infinite retells, to tell me this or that story all over again. And Tesla’s stories were, almost as a rule, high above on top of that wish list of mine. I had enjoyed hearing same lines again and again and vividly watching in my imagination pictures from Tesla’s childhood and youth. Nikola T. in a way became a pal of mine.

Many years later, while attending School of Electrical Engineering in Belgrade, in the school’s largest eponymous amphitheater Tesla in bronze stood silently in the corner. Nikola T. was resting his head against his fist, his regard absent and reflexive, while listening a tons of lessons about electricity, electromagnetic waves, frequency modulation, etc, etc. Nick was sharing all secrets, jokes and jargon of us eager and impatient freshmen, always there, and always our reliable confidant.

A real epiphany was, however, bound to occur in the new century. Mesmerized, I stood still without moving, fascinated, intimidated with my eyes fixed at powerful scenery of Niagara Falls, in a deafening tumult and thousands of miniscule water drops dispersed all around. It was not far away from there, some hundred and something years before, that Tesla had it built the first hydro-electric power plant in the world. At that divine place worthy of earthly beauty and Tesla’s genius, I was finally able to grasp the greatness of his achievements and spiritually recharge at the source of his inspiration.

Srdjan Pavlovic (electrical engineer & IT expert)

Oxana Bogachkina about Nikola Tesla

Medium logo, Tesla Memory Project

Nikola Tesla, a man who revolutionized the world with his inventions, deserves our gratitude every time we switch on a light or plug in an electronic device. Not only do we owe Tesla for global electrification, but also wireless communication and radio. Tesla was a genius of his epoch who generously passed on his heritage to us.

Besides his discoveries, I appreciate Tesla’s personal qualities, his will, and his efforts to improve the world by providing people with free, accessible energy. During his life he had to overcome many obstacles including the War of currents with Thomas Edison, who was jealous of Tesla’s new and more efficient alternative current system, the endless attacks of J.P. Morgan, insatiable for the profit of his company, and finally poverty at the end of his life… Still, nothing ever corrupted this man: neither money, nor the threats of ill-wishers.

I find it important for people to be aware of the scale of Tesla’s contribution to the development of humanity and to share their appreciation with each other. Personally speaking, I myself was inspired by the workshop about Tesla given by Aleksandar Protic, during the Youth Forum “Greater Europe: focus Russia” in Strasbourg (2013).Thanks to this workshop I got an incentive not only to learn more about Tesla and his life, but also to share what I had learned by telling others about this great person – a man whose name should not be forgotten and whose impact on our lives should not be underestimated.

Oxana Bogachkina

Moscow State University School of International Relations

Tesla round table at UNESCO Headquarters

Human Rights Day at UNESCO Headquarters

07/12/2013 by FFC UNESCO

Under the auspices of UNESCO and FFC UNESCO, UNESCO Club Sorbonne had organized a round table dedicated to Nikola Tesla.

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 TESLA round table

7/12/2013  UNESCO, Paris  10:00 – 12:30

 

Aleksandar Protic – Introduction : Tesla, life, legacy, importance 

Tesla Project in India at Sustainable Leadership Summit

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TESLIANUM Centar by Nataly Vukobrat

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 Novi Sad – Tesla’s town by Aleksandra Stajic

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 The International Tesla Congress by Slobodan Ivetic

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 Tesla performance

created by  Ugo Venel and Louis-Pierre Duval

actors: Pierre Londiche (Edison) and Sergey Filipenko (Tesla)

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Club UNESCO Sorbonne had also organized the art exhibition dedicated to Tesla. Following artists had exposed Tesla paintings : Mila Gajin, Aimé Venel, Roberto Letana, Samuel Moucha

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Furthermore, following Cross-cultural ambassadors had received their title :
Michele Paris, Boris Vukobrat, Jean-Francois Sabouret and Bojan Zulfikarpasic.

 

 

 Human Rights Day 2013 

“All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.

This is Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on December 10, 1948.

As the first universal instrument recognizing the inherent dignity of every member of the human family, the Declaration embodied centuries of thinking – it marked also the start of concerted global efforts to realise human rights in all circumstances.

A major step was taken in 1993, with the creation of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. Adopted 20 years ago, the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action remain sharply relevant today, reaffirming the universality of human rights, their inter-relatedness and importance for development. Great strides have been taken since then, but full respect for the exercise of human rights remains elusive.

In 2000, the Millennium Development Goals set an ambitious humanist agenda, which has catalysed significant progress in many countries. However, 2.7 billion women and men still live with just over 2 dollars a day. Access to quality education is still a dream for millions of girls and women. The most disadvantaged parts of societies continue to be victim to exclusion, abuse and violence. At the same time, the rule of law remains weak in many countries, and freedom of opinion and expression face rising threats.

To realise freedom and equality in dignity and rights for all women and men, we must do everything to support countries in meeting the Millennium Development Goals by 2015. We need to meet the promises made in 2000, while setting a new ambitious sustainable development agenda to follow, concentrating on the elimination of extreme poverty across the world. Poverty elimination is a foundation for lasting peace and sustainable development – this is a key lesson of the last 65 years. This should be our new global agenda for human rights, with a special focus on the rights of women and their empowerment.

The 20th anniversary of Vienna Conference is an opportunity for all Governments, societies, women and men to rally together and look forward. Great progress has been made since 1948 and 1993, but much hard work still lies ahead to make dignity and rights a reality for all.”

Message from Ms Irina Bokova, Director-General of UNESCO on the occasion of Human Rights Day, 10 December 2013

Ishaq Badis Boutaleb : Tesla article

Nikola Tesla, a common name, but a unique story. Whenever I hear this name, my mind gives me allocations of a spark, electric power, X-rays and radio frequencies used in different fields such as Science, Medicine and Environment. These inventions are not of actuality indeed, but how many minds did they challenge? How many lives did they save and change? And more importantly, who gave the chance to humankind to enter an era of new technologies?

The contribution of his genius to science particularly and humanity in general can only be seen by those who know to appreciate, Tesla is everywhere around, from the light at our places, to the smart phones we daily use. Tesla did not just set the technology basis; but he radically changed our habits to forever. His limitless imagination led him to be the starter of nowadays industrialized civilization, even if he was always misunderstood and criticized, his only mistake was that he has been born ahead of his time. When once he announced that he could develop a ‘’wireless energy” and “remote controlled machines”, his peers said he was crazy, but the fact was that he could visualize his inventions, and our present adoption of his inventions witnesses and confirms the truth of his statements almost a century later.

As an Operations Research Engineer, Nikola Tesla inspires me by his:

Humanity:

The main researches he made were in order to give to humanity a better life, he was constantly determined to provide power equally to everyone on earth, and this value caused him disagreements with his investors and put him into permanent conflicts with the competitors of his time, but he never gave up on his personal mission.

Resilience:

His life has not been that easy that we could imagine. Being able to stand out of a crowd composed of Edison and Einstein is enough said to describe his genius, he believed in his work when nobody did. He got fired, insulted, his alternating current model was rejected, treated as a fool, his laboratory was even burned but he kept trying. His answer to his enemies was not a word, but master pieces of like no other inventions. When the world elite were impressed by relativity and quantum mechanics, he declared: “The present time is theirs, but the future is mine!”.

Humble spirit:

Tesla was aware of his outstanding potential, he knew how unique his researches were but he never overestimated himself. He asked for advices and involved other people in his works, and when the world praised his inventions, he modestly commented: “I am not an inventor, I am a discoverer”.

In his memory, I would like to say: thank you Nikola Tesla not for enlightening our daily life, but for enlightening our minds.

Ishaq Badis BOUTALEB

University of Science and Technology of Algiers – Algeria